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FAQs

How long does it take to get out of jail?

The simple answer to this question is that it depends on the circumstances. Different jails have different procedures. A person has to be booked into the jail, and all the necessary documentation has to be turned in and completed. Depending on various factors, including the time of day and the number of people in jail that have to be processed, it could be more than 24 hours before a bond amount is even set.

However, the good news is that, in most circumstances, an attorney is able to get someone out of jail much more quickly and at less expense than someone who does not call an attorney. Attorneys licensed in the State of Texas can speak with the client in jail, collect the necessary information, fill out the bond paperwork and even meet with a judge and request that bond be set. At The Owens Law Firm, we can prioritize our client's cases, speak with a judge, get a bond amount set and do whatever is legally possible to help get the client released in short order.

Once bail is posted, the client will be released as soon as he/she is discharged. Getting discharged from jail can take a few minutes, a few hours or all day. Realistically, a person will probably be in custody for at least six hours before he or she can be released. It will usually take 4-6 hours for somebody to be released from jail once the judge signs the bail bond and the lawyer turns it into Central Booking. However, having an attorney working hard to get the client out of jail can make the process much quicker and as painless as possible.

Where is the County Jail?

Directions

Both Tarrant County and Dallas County have multiple county jails. To find out where an inmate is being held, go to https://ijis.tarrantcounty.com/inmatesearch/ if the inmate is in the Tarrant County system or http://www.dallascounty.org/jaillookup/search.jsp if the inmate is in the Dallas County system.

The Dallas County Jail is located on the 8th - 12th floors of the George Allen, Sr. Courts Building, 600 Commerce St., Dallas, TX 75202. The phone number is 214-653-6092. Another jail facility is located across I-35 at 111 Commerce Street, Dallas, TX 75207. Detailed directions are available via Google Map.

The Tarrant County Corrections Center is located at 100 N. Lamar St., Fort Worth, TX 76102. The phone number is 817-884-3116. Other facilities are located throughout Fort Worth. Detailed directions are available via Google Map.

What is Community Supervision?

In Texas, "community supervision" refers to a court's placement of a defendant under a continuum of programs and sanctions with conditions imposed by the court for a specified period. Criminal proceedings may be deferred without an adjudication of guilt. Texas offers two types of probation: (1) deferred adjudication community supervision, and (2) judicial community supervision or "straight probation." The consequences of a probation violation can depend on the type of probation.

What is "domestic violence"?

Domestic violence in the state of Texas refers to the intentional harm of a family member or one in a dating relationship. This can come in the form of physical abuse, threats, assault and/or battery, sexual assault or stalking. "Family violence" is a form of domestic violence. In Texas, "family violence" refers to dating violence, child abuse, and any act by a member of a family or household against another member of the family or household that is intended to result in physical harm, bodily injury, assault or sexual assault or that threatens the member with imminent physical harm, bodily injury, assault or sexual assault, other than defensive measures to protect oneself.

What is a DWI/DUI offense in Texas?

Driving while intoxicated (DWI) and driving under the influence (DUI) are two different offenses in Texas. The charge of Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) is made when a person is intoxicated while operating a motor vehicle in a public place. A person is considered "intoxicated" under Texas law if the person is determined to have a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or more while operating a motor vehicle and/or is impaired by the loss of his/her normal use of mental or physical faculties because of the introduction of alcohol or drugs or a combination of alcohol and drugs. There are several different field sobriety tests that law enforcement use to determine if that level has been reached, and the timing and type of test can greatly influence the results and can lead to innocent people being arrested for DWI.

The charge of Driving Under the Influence (DUI) is made when a person under the age of 21 (a minor) operates a motor vehicle in a public place or a watercraft "while having any detectable amount of alcohol" in his/her system. Someone 17 or older can be prosecuted as an adult for DWI if intoxicated or a DUI if any alcohol is detected. If under 17, then you can still be prosecuted for DUI; Texas law provides for the prosecution, conviction and punishment of juveniles who drink alcohol and drive.

What are the ranges of punishment in Texas?

In Texas, all criminal offenses are designated as either felonies or misdemeanors. There are five degrees of felonies and three classes of misdemeanors.

In a capital felony case, the state can choose whether or not to seek the death penalty as a punishment. A defendant convicted of a capital felony in a case in which the state seeks the death penalty shall be punished by death or by imprisonment in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) for life without parole. An individual convicted of a capital felony in a case in which the state does not seek the death penalty shall be punished by imprisonment in TDCJ for: life without parole, unless the individual's case was transferred to the court under Section 54.02 of the Texas Family Code, in which case the defendant may be sentenced to life without parole or life with the possibility of parole after the time the inmate has served equals 40 calendar years (without consideration of good conduct time). The range of punishment for other offenses is as follows:

CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENSE

PUNISHMENT

Felony of the first degree

Imprisonment in TDCJ for 5-99 yrs. or life and a fine of $10,000 or less

Felony of the second degree

2-20 years in TDCJ and a fine of $10,000 or less

Felony of the third degree*

2-10 years in TDCJ and a fine of $10,000 or less

State jail felony*

Confinement in a state jail for anywhere from 180 days to two years and a fine of $10,000 or less*

Class A misdemeanor*

A fine not to exceed $4,000 and/or up to one year in jail

Class B misdemeanor

A fine not to exceed $2,000 and/or up to 180 days in jail

Class C misdemeanor

A fine not to exceed $500

*A court may punish a defendant who is convicted of a state jail felony by imposing a jail sentence of as little as one year if the court finds that such punishment would best serve the ends of justice. (The court may also authorize the prosecuting attorney to prosecute a state jail felony as a Class A misdemeanor.) However, a defendant convicted of a state jail felony shall be punished for a third-degree felony if:

  • A "deadly weapon" (1) was used or exhibited during the commission of the felony or during immediate flight following the commission of the felony, and (2) the individual used or exhibited the deadly weapon or was a party to the offense and knew that a deadly weapon would be used or exhibited

or

  • The defendant has previously been finally convicted of any of the following:

- Continuous trafficking of persons under § 20A.03 of the Texas Penal Code

- Continuous sexual abuse of a young child or children under § 21.02 of the Texas Penal Code

- Murder

- Capital murder

- Indecency with a child

- Aggravated kidnapping

- Aggravated sexual assault

- Aggravated robbery

- An offense under the Texas Controlled Substances Act for which punishment is increased because the defendant used or attempted to use a child to commit or assist in the commission of the offense

- An offense under the Texas Controlled Substances Act for which punishment is increased under § 481.134(c), (d), (e) or (f) of the Texas Health and Safety Code, but only if it is shown that the defendant has been previously convicted of an offense for which punishment was increased under any of those subsections;

- Sexual assault

- Injury to a child or disabled individual, if the offense is punishable as a felony of the first degree and the victim of the offense is a child;

- Sexual performance by a child

- Criminal solicitation under § 15.03 of the Texas Penal Code, if the offense is punishable as a felony of the first degree

- Compelling prostitution

- Trafficking of persons

- Any felony for which the judgment contains an affirmative finding that a deadly weapon was used or exhibited during the commission of a felony offense or during the getaway and that the defendant used or exhibited the deadly weapon or was a party to the offense and knew that a deadly weapon would be used or exhibited.

These punishments may be increased if the defendant is shown to be a "repeat" or "habitual" offender, if the offense was committed because of bias or prejudice, if as a result of the crime committed a nursing or convalescent home incurred a loss, if a controlled substance was used to commit the offense, or if the offense was committed in a disaster area or evacuated area.

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610 East Weatherford St.
Fort Worth TX 76102
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